July 17 Marks the Inaugural Glioblastoma Awareness Day in the United States

Today is Glioblastoma Awareness Day, a recognition established for July 17, 2019 by an official resolution that was approved by the United States Senate. The resolution (S.Res. 245) creates a unique opportunity to focus the nation’s attention on glioblastoma (GBM).

Glioblastoma Awareness Day is an opportunity to honor those that have been affected and take action to defeat these devastating tumors.

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Children's Cause Webinar Provides Mid-Year Advocacy Update

Children’s Cause hosted a webinar in late June to provide childhood cancer advocates with an advocacy update, now that the 116th Congress has been in session for six months. The webinar covered where things stand with various pieces of legislation that could impact children with cancer and childhood cancer survivors, including research funding, implementation of the STAR Act and ACE Kids Act, progress of the CLINICAL TREATMENT Act, and a survivorship initiative in the works that focuses on transitions of care. On the latter issue, our webinar covered Passport for Care as a model program that has demonstrated success in the area of transitioning from active treatment to long-term survivorship care.

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Formal Report Issued to FDA on Chemo-Induced Hearing Loss in Pediatrics

As one of the co-hosts of last fall's workshop on chemotherapy-induced hearing loss in pediatrics, the Children's Cause is proud to share the formal Voice of the Patient report submitted to the FDA last week.

The formal report provides the FDA with patient perspectives to inform their regulatory decision-making and improve the drug development process. It is our hope that this report will be used to guide approvals of much-needed therapies to prevent - and ultimately treat - chemotherapy-induced hearing loss in survivors of childhood cancer.

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Your Role in Childhood Cancer Research Funding

As advocates in the childhood cancer community know all too well, funding for research is largely dependent on federal funding from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), which supports academic researchers and much of the clinical trials infrastructure that treats and cares for our kids. 
 
The amount that NCI is able to devote to those programs – and other cancer programs -  is, in turn, dependent on what Congress determines in its annual appropriations process. And much of that is determined by how hard advocates - like you – push their members of Congress to make it a priority.

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