Posts in Policy
Authorization to Appropriation: Next Steps for STAR Act

Earlier this month, President Donald Trump signed the Childhood Cancer STAR Act into law, authorizing $30 million annually from 2019-2023 for programs and research to combat childhood cancer through the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 

Now, we work to get the STAR Act fully funded -- and all indications suggest this process is off to a good start! On Thursday, the Senate Appropriations Committee approved a fiscal year 2019 spending bill that includes funding for implementation of STAR.

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STAR Act Becomes Law: $30 million per year authorized to combat childhood cancer

President Donald Trump signed the Childhood Cancer STAR Act into law yesterday, June 5th, authorizing $30 million annually from 2019-2023 for programs and research to combat childhood cancer through the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 

Now, we move on to the next step in the process:  securing full funding for the STAR Act. Please join us in thanking Congress for passing STAR and in requesting that the authorized funding be fully appropriated.

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Rescission Watch: Take action to protect cancer research funding!

We joined with other research advocates to thank Congressional appropriations leaders for securing an unprecedented $3 billion increase in NIH funding as part of the FY2018 omnibus spending bill. This boost to medical research funding comes at a critical time, as advances in precision medicine hold the key to more children surviving and thriving after a cancer diagnosis than ever before.

But then, we started hearing a term called 'rescission' thrown around in Washington. An appropriations process that we had celebrated as a victory for medical research suddenly started to sound not-so-final. 

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Breaking down the Budget: Implications on Public Health

For those of us in the childhood cancer community desperate for new treatments, one of the most important resources is the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The vast majority of childhood cancer research is funded by the NCI, which provides grants to researchers and supports cooperative groups that test new treatments in clinical trials. While Congress doesn't determine the exact amount of funding NCI will spend on pediatric research, a rising tide of funding will ensure that more is dedicated to childhood cancer research. That's why it's critical that we impress upon our representatives the urgency of NCI funding...

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