May : Brain Tumor Awareness & Melanoma Awareness

BRAIN TUMOR AWARENESS MONTH: Brain tumors are the second most common type of childhood cancer (after leukemia) and the leading cause of cancer deaths among children and adolescents. Today, 3 out of every 10 childhood cancer deaths are caused by brain cancer.

MELANOMA RISK FOR CHILDHOOD CANCER SURVIVORS: A recent study noted that childhood cancer survivors who had lived five or more years from their primary malignancy are at an increased risk of developing skin cancer compared with the general population.

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Easter Recess, NCI Funding, and You:

Members of Congress are back home for a two-week district work period -- also known as Easter Recess. If you're interested in meeting with your Congressional representatives about childhood cancer issues, this is an ideal time to find your Senators and Representative somewhere near you!

When Congress returns to Washington at the end of April, they will resume budget talks for fiscal year 2020. So now is the time to emphasize to your Senators and Representative the life-saving importance of robust funding for the NCI.

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Childhood Cancer Advocates Collaborate at AACR Annual Meeting

Childhood cancer advocates, including our own founder Susan L. Weiner, were among the thousands of oncology experts in attendance at this week’s American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting in Atlanta.

We’re particularly proud that Susan was part of a major symposium panel on pediatric oncology with a dual prong focus on implementation of the RACE for Children Act and on the global potential of the ACCELERATE multi-stakeholder platform.

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Which Way for Childhood Cancer Funding?

Last month childhood cancer advocates were encouraged – and somewhat surprised – when President Trump announced a childhood cancer research initiative at the State of the Union address, proposed at some $500 million over ten years – or $50 million a year. 

The promise of that extra funding and any new initiatives was thrown into doubt this week with the release of the Administration’s budget proposal.  It recommended that the National Cancer Institute (NCI) be cut by 17% or $897 million; theoretically dwarfing any increase in childhood cancer funding. 

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